Swainson’s Hawk

The Swainson’s Hawk is a summer resident of California, found mostly in the central valley and in agricultural areas. In 2013, the first pair in decades was confirmed to have nested and fledged in Santa Clara County in Coyote Valley, so we may be seeing the start of a range expansion for the species.

  • Species:
    Swainson’s Hawk (Buteo swainsoni )
  • Date Taken:
    June 13, 2013
  • Location:
    San Luis National Wildlife Refuge
  • Camera:
    Canon 7D
  • Lens:
    Canon EF 70-200F2.8L IS II + 2.0x TC
  • Tags:
    2013 best of year, Birds, California, Merced County, San Luis National Wildlife Refuge, Swainson’s Hawk
Posted in Photo of the Day

Three Dot Lounge for July 20, 2014

Three dot lounge is a mostly-weekly collection of things that deserve more than a retweet. Stay tuned for fascinating opinions and pithy commentary. Also keep an eye on my Twitter feed for more interesting stuff.

Protecting Your Photographic Memories. You Need to See This

Protecting Your Photographic Memories. You Need to See This

Are you computers properly backed up yet? Yeah, you, the person trying to sneak out the back of the room. What happens to your photos if your hard disk crashes or your laptop gets stolen? How many times have I told you to back things up?

And I’m going to keep harping on this until you actually do it.

Avatar

Avatar

David “Strobist” Hobby has some very interesting thoughts on your own headshot and avatar and how it’s an important part of your online branding. It reminded me that I was long overdue to update my headshot on Linkedin (so I did).

At the same time, people who follow me on the various sites will note that other than on Linkedin I never use a head shot of myself as my avatar. It’s always one of my images. This is by design, not just because I have a face made for radio, but also because to me, even though my branding (such as it is) is around my name for my photography, what matters is my images, not me, and so I want those images front and center, not my smiling face.

That, and I don’t want to make it any easier for stalkers to track me down than I have to. Because, you know, Stalkers haven’t discovered my Linkedin profile yet.

Confessions of an ex-developer

Confessions of an ex-developer

More interesting discussion on the whole “I am not a developer any more” from last week. I don’t code full time any more, and I haven’t for years, but I wonder just what “a developer” means, because I’m still doing site architecture and design for communities, and I still find myself elbow deep (and cussing) at HTML and CSS and even some javascript on a regular basis. “not a developer” doesn’t imply “not technical”, it’s just that the kind of technical problems I’ve shifted into solving are different, and in many ways, a lot bigger in scope and complexity than the ones I solved when I lived in a text editor and compiler.

Seems to me that’s part of the natural progression as you age and move from a primarily tactical role of writing code to a more strategic role of definining what needs to be built. And that’s not a bad thing.

Morro Bay Drone Flight – Zebras, Sea Lions, and Oceans Oh My!

Morro Bay Drone Flight – Zebras, Sea Lions, and Oceans Oh My!

Here is a perfect example of why drones are going to be regulated and restricted. They can be very useful tools for people who use them with care, but in this youtube, you see this guy fly it through the Hearst Castle zebras, causing them to react and run off; he flies it over kayakers in the Morro Bay Harbor where if there’s a problem with the unit, it could crash on them.

It’s the lack of care of its impact on the others (human and animal) around the pilot that’s the problem; I haven’t even gotten into the fun of being in earshot of one of these things when they’re flown, or finding my own photography shut down because someone’s flown a quad copter up into the scene I’m trying to photograph for the third time.

Unfortunately, there are enough people who only care about what they can do and not enough about the impacts of their using these devices on others, and that’s going to cause them to be restricted and regulated, and that’s too bad because there are a bunch of really good and careful people doing a lot of fascinating stuff with them who will get nailed by the bad eggs.

Posted in Three Dot Lounge

Black-Necked Stilt Bathing

A Black-Necked Stilt enthusiastically bathes while a Marbled Godwit looks on. Stilts are a very common shorebird in the Bay Area. Okay, honestly, they’re everywhere, and they’re year-round residents that nest here. They can be found both as individuals and in small flocks and are known for being somewhat skittish. They tend to be a marsh’s early warning system because they react to movement by flying off and making a lot of noise. Sort of like that car down the street who’s alarm goes off constantly. Stilts and American Avocets are the two most common shorebirds in the region.

  • Species:
    Black-Necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus)
  • Date Taken:
    May 11, 2012
  • Location:
    Moss Landing Harbor/Jetty Road
  • Camera:
    Canon 7D
  • Lens:
    Canon EF70-200F2.8L IS II + 2.0x TC
  • Tags:
    Black-necked Stilt, California, Marbled Godwit, Monterey County, Moss Landing Harbor
Posted in Photo of the Day